Young people on asylum seekers: The ‘dirty work’ of boundary making in the politics of belonging

Christine Margaret HALSE, Rosalyn BLACK, Claire CHARLES

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter examines how primary and secondary students construct asylum seekers. Invoking racialised political and media rhetoric, some students cast asylum seekers as strangers, undesirable citizens and a threat to the nation’s values and structures. Others argue that asylum seekers are ‘ordinary people’ who warrant the nation’s compassion and care. A third group struggles to navigate the binary of inclusion/exclusion but ends up reasserting the logic and methods of Britain’s invasion of Indigenous Australia. They advocate ‘caring’ for asylum seekers in purpose-built, model towns in geographically remote, unoccupied lands (terra nullius) where they will be ‘separated from us’ but ‘still live in Australia’. The analysis reveals that even young people are active participants in the racialised politics of belonging and the 'dirty work of boundary making'. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInterrogating belonging for young people in schools
EditorsChristine HALSE
Place of PublicationCham
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages117-139
ISBN (Electronic)9783319752174
ISBN (Print)9783319752167
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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asylum seeker
politics
invasion
rhetoric
exclusion
student
town
inclusion
threat
citizen
Values
Group

Citation

Halse, C., Black, R., & Charles, C. (2018). Young people on asylum seekers: The ‘dirty work’ of boundary making in the politics of belonging. In C. Halse (Ed.), Interrogating belonging for young people in schools (pp. 117-139). Cham: Palgrave Macmillan.

Keywords

  • Asylum seekers
  • Race
  • Racism
  • Care
  • Citizen
  • Indigenous