Yield and metal uptake of Cynodon dactylon (bermuda grass) grown on refuse-compost-amended soil

Ming Hung WONG, L.M. CHU

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a glasshouse trial, refuse compost was mixed with a loamy sand at rates equivalent to 0, 10, 25, 50 and 75 tonnes ha−1 before planting seeds of bermuda grass. Adding compost to the soil increased the concentration of various heavy metals. The aerial parts of the grass were clipped at 20 mm above soil level at Day 60 and 120. The roots were harvested at the 120th day. The yield of bermuda grass was greatest with the highest rate of compost application, probably because of the combined effect of enhanced germination and improved growth. The second cut also yielded more than the first cut at the heaviest level of composting.
With the exception of Pb (aerial and root portions), Mn (root portion only) and Cd (root portion only), metal contents of bermuda grass were increased by compost applications. In general, the root portion contained higher levels of metals (Cd, Cu and Zn) than the aerial part. It was also found that contents of Cd, Mn and Zn were higher in the foliage of the second harvest than the first one. Copyright © 1985 Published by Elsevier B.V.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-52
JournalAgriculture, Ecosystems & Environment
Volume14
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1985

Citation

Wong, M. H., & Chu, L. M. (1985). Yield and metal uptake of Cynodon dactylon (bermuda grass) grown on refuse-compost-amended soil. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 14(1-2), 41-52. doi: 10.1016/0167-8809(85)90083-0

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