When secular and Qur’anic worldviews encounter: Educational experiences in conventional schools and Madrasahs in Hong Kong

Wai Yip HO, Jiajun Martin HE, Wing Fung NG

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This paper explores teaching and learning experiences concerning young Pakistani Muslims in Hong Kong, who are found simultaneously immersed in two divergent systems of education - first, the conventional daytime schools where students are educated formally with general knowledge, and second, the madrasahs (Islamic learning institutes) where student recite Qur’an and receive religious teachings every day after school. Based on the ongoing ethnographic fieldwork (with methods including participant observation and interviews) in both local conventional schools and madrasahs in Hong Kong, this paper reveals that the three parties involved, namely the Chinese-speaking educators from conventional schools, the Qur’anic teachers from madrasahs (along with the students’ parents, who are often supporters of madrasah education), and the ethnic Muslim students, might have different understanding and expectations on education. This paper further argues that such difference could be a result of contrary worldviews and meanings of life to the two groups of educators, as well as limited communication between the two sides of educational institutes.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2015

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worldview
Hong Kong
school
Muslim
experience
student
educator
meaning of life
education
Teaching
participant observation
learning
speaking
parents
communication
teacher
interview
Group

Citation

Ho, W.-Y., He, J., & Ng, W.-F. M. (2015, December). When secular and Qur’anic worldviews encounter: Educational experiences in conventional schools and Madrasahs in Hong Kong. Paper presented at The Hong Kong Sociological Association 17th Annual Conference: Sociological Imagination in a Pluralist World, Hong Kong Shue Yan University, Hong Kong.