When nature heals: Nature exposure moderates the relationship between ostracism and aggression

Kai Tak POON, Fei TENG, Wing-Yan WONG, Zhansheng CHEN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prior studies have consistently shown that ostracism promotes aggression. The present research investigated the role of nature in reducing aggressive responses following ostracism. Three studies provided converging support to the prediction that nature exposure can weaken the relationship between ostracism and aggression. Compared with ostracized participants who viewed nature pictures, ostracized participants who viewed urban pictures indicated a higher willingness to assign a longer and colder exposure of painful chilled water to another person (Study 1), reported elevated aggressive urges in hypothetical situations (Study 2), and showed a higher intention to assign a spicier and larger amount of hot sauce to a person who hated spicy food (Study 3). Taken together, these findings highlight the importance of nature in influencing aggressive responses following ostracism. Implications are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-168
JournalJournal of Environmental Psychology
Volume48
Early online dateOct 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

Citation

Poon, K.-T., Teng, F., Wong, W.-Y., & Chen, Z. (2016). When nature heals: Nature exposure moderates the relationship between ostracism and aggression. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 48, 159-168.

Keywords

  • Ostracism
  • Nature exposure
  • Social exclusion
  • Aggression
  • Antisocial behavior

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