When justice surrenders: The effect of just-world beliefs on aggression following ostracism

Kai Tak POON, Zhansheng CHEN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present research examined the influence of general just-world beliefs on aggression following ostracism. The findings provided converging support for the hypothesis that people with weak general just-world beliefs, either measured (Studies 1 and 4) or primed (Studies 2 and 3), would behave more aggressively following ostracism than people with strong general just-world beliefs. Furthermore, perceived deservingness (Study 3) or attribution (Study 4) mediated the relationship between general just-world beliefs and aggression following ostracism. These findings highlight the significance of general just-world beliefs in understanding the coping responses to negative interpersonal experiences. The implications are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-112
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume52
Early online date22 Jan 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2014

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Citation

Poon, K.-T., & Chen, Z. (2014). When justice surrenders: The effect of just-world beliefs on aggression following ostracism. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 52, 101-112. doi: 10.1016/j.jesp.2014.01.006

Keywords

  • Just-world belief
  • Ostracism
  • Social exclusion
  • Aggression
  • Antisocial behaviour