What students feel in school influences the strategies they use for learning: Academic emotions and cognitive/meta-cognitive strategies

Ronnel Bornasal KING, Shaljan AREEPATTAMANNIL

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate how academic emotions were related to cognitive and metacognitive strategy use. Secondary school students (N = 1,147) participated in this study and answered relevant questionnaires on academic emotions (enjoyment, hope, pride, anger, anxiety, shame, hopelessness, and boredom) and the use of various cognitive (elaboration, organisation, and rehearsal) and metacognitive strategies (planning, monitoring, regulating). Results of the analyses indicated that students who experienced positive emotions were more likely to use different types of cognitive and metacognitive strategies. Negative academic emotions were found to be non-significant predictors of strategy use. Implications are discussed. Copyright © 2014 The Author(s).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18-27
JournalJournal of Pacific Rim Psychology
Volume8
Issue number1
Early online date13 May 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2014

    Fingerprint

Citation

King, R. B., & Areepattamannil, S. (2014). What students feel in school influences the strategies they use for learning: Academic emotions and cognitive/meta-cognitive strategies. Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology, 8(1), 18-27. doi: 10.1017/prp.2014.3

Keywords

  • Achievement emotions
  • Academic emotions
  • Control-value theory
  • Cognitive strategies
  • Metacognitive strategies