What comes after post-Soviet? Towards a new concept of de-Sovietization in higher education and research

Liz SHCHEPETYLNYKOVA, Anatoly V. OLEKSIYENKO

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

For almost three decades, scholars sought to understand the transformations of higher education systems previously subjected to totalitarian Soviet control. Early attempts to investigate post-Soviet reforms provided limited explanations of the chaotic and challenging nature of these transformations, inducing a valid critique of the dominant interpretation of the post-Soviet changes as a unidirectional transition from the party/state-dominated model to a Western market-oriented system. The processes of deconstructing the Soviet legacy have remained under-studied, while post-Soviet research in education largely accepts the legitimization and even re-integration of the past. By drawing on existing theoretical and empirical scholarship, this article explains why a new conceptualization of de-Sovietization is needed in higher education research and why the processes of re-envisioning values, practices, and institutions in the post-Soviet education and research are necessary to promote critical inquiry, academic freedom, and scholars’ agential responsibilities. Copyright © 2024 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103014
JournalInternational Journal of Educational Development
Volume106
Early online dateFeb 2024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2024

Citation

Shchepetylnykova, L., & Oleksiyenko, A. V. (2024). What comes after post-Soviet? Towards a new concept of de-Sovietization in higher education and research. International Journal of Educational Development, 106, Article 103014. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijedudev.2024.103014

Keywords

  • De-Sovietization
  • Higher education
  • Research capacity
  • Post-Soviet reforms

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