Well-being in Canadian research universities: Investigating the role of emotion regulation strategies

Raheleh SALIMZADEH, Alenoush SAROYAN, Hui WANG, Nathan C. HALL

Research output: Contribution to conferencePapers

Abstract

Fundamental changes in higher education institutions worldwide have resulted in increased vulnerability to job-related stress, which in turn compromises personal and occupational well-being of academics. Given the unexplored nature of the impact of emotion regulation on well-being among faculty members, the present study examined the impact of cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression strategies on emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, quitting intentions, and physical health. Questionnaire data from 585 academics from 13 Canadian research-intensive universities were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Results reveal that reappraisal is a significant predictor of the four aspects of well-being. Additionally, suppression is a significant predictor of emotional exhaustion and physical well-being. Findings can inform the design and implementation of interventions aiming to maintain faculty well-being. Copyright © 2019 All Academic, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019

Citation

Salimzadeh, R., Saroyan, A., Wang, H., & Hall, N. C. (2019, April). Well-being in Canadian research universities: Investigating the role of emotion regulation strategies. Paper presented at The American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting (AERA 2019): Paper session of faculty well-being, Toronto, Canada.

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