Using portfolio assessment as an innovation to assess problem-based learning in Hong Kong schools

Sharon Lynne BRYANT, Andrew Anthony TIMMINS

Research output: Contribution to conferencePapers

Abstract

This paper will report the results of an eighteen month pilot study which investigated the extent the portfolio assessment is used to assess problem-based learning by teachers and principals in schools in Hong Kong. Levels of acceptance, successful and not so successful techniques and attitudes are discussed. School subject teachers' and principals' perception are assessed with respect to the implementation process of portfolio assessment strengths, weaknesses, limitations. Constraints and problems identified with the use of portfolio assessment in the schools and classrooms are presented. As schools move towards reforming the assessment system the researchers feel the use of portfolios is an important aspect of quality reform that can be used to better assess problem-based learning. Currently portfolio assessment is under-utilized in Hong Kong even though recent policy and reform documents have called for this type of alternate student assessment. The research revealed that this is due in part to the fact that few education officials thoroughly understand the impact of such an assessment strategy and have done little to prepare teachers and administrators. It is therefore felt that the findings of this study can significantly direct the work of education officials in a leadership role strategy for implementing alternative assessment strategies such as portfolio assessment for teachers, principals, and other educators.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2000

Citation

Bryant, S. L., & Timmins, A. A. (2000, December). Using portfolio assessment as an innovation to assess problem-based learning in Hong Kong schools. Paper presented at the 2nd Asia-Pacific Conference on Problem-Based Learning, Singapore.

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