Using local languages in English language classrooms

Ahmar MAHBOOB, Mei Yi Angel LIN

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter explores possible roles that local languages can play in English language classrooms. In order to do this, the chapter starts off by discussing some of the factors that have historically marginalised the role of local languages in English language teaching. It then discusses how non-recognition of local languages is supported by and contributes to other hegemonic practices that limit the role of local languages in education. The chapter questions static, monolingual, and mono-modal models of language, and outlines a teaching-learning model that builds on a dynamic, situated, multimodal and semiotic understanding of language, which shows the possible roles that local languages can play in English language education. In doing so, the chapter provides some guidelines on how teachers can use local languages productively in their classrooms. The chapter also contributes to and encourages further research that extends our understanding of language (and language learning/teaching) in ways that enable and empower researchers and teachers to make a difference in their communities and in their students’ lives. Copyright © 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEnglish language teaching today: Linking theory and practice
EditorsWilly A. RENANDYA, Handoyo Puji WIDODO
Place of PublicationCham
PublisherSpringer
Pages25-40
ISBN (Electronic)9783319388342
ISBN (Print)9783319388328
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Citation

Mahboob, A., & Lin, A. M. Y. (2016). Using local languages in English language classrooms. In W. A. Renandya & H. P. Widodo (Eds.), English language teaching today: Linking theory and practice (pp. 25-40). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-38834-2_3

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