Use of computers and family life of tertiary students in Hong Kong

Lai King Kitty LAU-HO, Wing Kee AU

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Technology has become a part of life for those living in developed countries. The personal computer has changed the way people communicate information and has also caused some remarkable changes in the way we learn, teach, shop and bank. This in turn affects the well being of individuals and families. The present study examined how information technology (IT) has changed people’s lives and how computers might impact on families. It begins with a review of the impacts of computers on the well being of individuals and family. Then it reports a survey of 170 full-time tertiary students in Hong Kong. Findings indicated that there were changes in the amount of time young people devoted to various activities after the acquisition of a home computer. Conflicts were evidenced in some families as a result of the prolonged use of the computers. Recommendations are provided to assist individuals and families to respond positively to the impacts of computers on family life around the globe. Copyright © 2002 The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Conference on Computers in Education: Proceedings
Editors KINSHUK, R. LEWIS, K. AKAHORI , R. KEMP, T. OKAMOTO , L. HENDERSON , C.-H. LEE
Place of PublicationLos Alamitos, CA
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages494-498
Volume1
ISBN (Print)0769515096
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Citation

Lau, K., & Au, W. K. (2002). Use of computers and family life of tertiary students in Hong Kong. In Kinshuk, R. Lewis, K. Akahori, R. Kemp, T. Okamoto, L. Henderson, et al. (Eds.), International Conference on Computers in Education: Proceedings (Vol. 1, pp. 494-498). Los Alamitos, CA: IEEE Computer Society.

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