University students’ perceptions of ‘good citizens’ in Greater China: A comparative study of Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau, and Mainland China

Meng U. IEONG, Koon Lin WONG, Hui LI, Chi-Chen CHEN, Jinxin ZHU

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of civic education is to prepare students to become ‘good citizens’ aligned with the policies and political purposes of the regime to which they belong. This exploratory study employed a mixed methods design to construct a typology of ‘good citizens’ to understand university students’ perceptions of citizenship in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau and Mainland China. It found that the university students’ perceptions of ‘good citizens’ is constructed from two components: internal political efficacy and the connection between ‘good citizens’ and the regime. Students in these societies share a similar understanding of the first component but have significant divergences in the second component. These findings demonstrate a correlation between regime type and the perceptions of ‘good citizens’ and our typology could provide a conceptual framework to guide researchers in organising and conducting further comparative studies. Copyright © 2022 British Association for International and Comparative Education.
Original languageEnglish
JournalCompare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Oct 2022

Citation

Ieong, M. U., Wong, K. L., Li, H., Chen, C.-C., & Zhu, J. (2022). University students’ perceptions of ‘good citizens’ in Greater China: A comparative study of Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau, and Mainland China. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/03057925.2022.2129958

Keywords

  • ‘Good citizens’
  • University students
  • Greater China
  • The typology of ‘good citizens’

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