University students' perceptions of English as an International Language (EIL) in Taiwan and South Korea

Ju Seong LEE, Jun CHEN HSIEH

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated Taiwanese and Korean students' perceptions of four aspects of English as an International Language (EIL): Current Status of English (CSE), Varieties of English (VE), Strategies for Multilingual/Multicultural Communication (SMC), and English Speakers' Identity (ESI). The authors surveyed a total of 246 non-English majors at one university (N = 105) in Taiwan and at two universities (N = 141) in South Korea. Three major findings were identified in this study: first, these contemporary Far Eastern EFL students positively endorse general concepts of EIL. Second, both groups perceive their English ownership in a similar, positive manner in contrast to their own local varieties such as Taiwanese English and Korean English. Third, English listening materials that include non-native English-speaking (NNES) accents, and interaction between NNESs seem to be less accepted by Korean students than is the case for Taiwanese students. Along with practical suggestions, this study will add new knowledge to the current EIL literature and expand our understanding of this issue across different contexts. Copyright © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)789-802
JournalJournal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development
Volume39
Issue number9
Early online dateFeb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Citation

Lee, J. S., & Chen Hsieh, J. (2018). University students' perceptions of English as an International Language (EIL) in Taiwan and South Korea. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 39(9), 789-802. doi: 10.1080/01434632.2018.1438448

Keywords

  • English as an International Language (EIL)
  • Perception
  • The expanding circle
  • Taiwan
  • South Korea

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