Understanding campus-based intercultural social capital for minority university students in Hong Kong

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Social capital accrued via cross-racial/ethnic networks plays an important role in the adjustment, persistence and success for minority groups of university students. Yet, few studies offered insight into how intercultural social capital impacts learning and socialising experiences among minority students in non-Western contexts. Drawing on interviews with minority university students in Hong Kong, this study canvassed their intercultural networking, its influences and institutional factors that conditioned its accessibility. Findings showed that participants garnered a full array of social capital in ethnic minority cliques, whereas their connections with institutional agents were more inclined to pastoral care rather than academic advising and mentor services. This study unearthed a campus environment wherein a monolithic Chinese/Cantonese culture and de facto racial/ethnic-segregation contributed to their restricted academic/social engagements with other counterparts and added to the manifestations of marginalisation in the literature that has been preoccupied with racial lines around the Black-White binary in Western contexts. Copyright © 2024 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Original languageEnglish
JournalComparative Education
Early online dateFeb 2024
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Feb 2024

Citation

Gao, F. (2024). Understanding campus-based intercultural social capital for minority university students in Hong Kong. Comparative Education. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/03050068.2024.2317070

Keywords

  • Intercultural social capital
  • Academic and social support
  • Collective and individual agents
  • Minority university students
  • Hong Kong
  • 跨文化社會資本
  • 學業和社會支持
  • 集體和個體能動性
  • 少數族裔大學生
  • 香港
  • Alt. title: 探究香港少數族裔大學生之校園跨文化社會資本

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