Troubling the child as individual: The queer performativity of child-pet-dog entanglements

Affrica TAYLOR, Mindy BLAISE

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This paper works at the intersection of queer, feminist, and more-than-human studies to consider the performative effects of a series of child-pet-dog entanglements. These include events observed in a Hong Kong dog park and an Australian early childhood education setting, and the dog-child-nature figures that feature in William Wegman’s North American art and film productions. Through focussing upon these diverse child-animal entanglements, the authors set out to challenge the normativity of western education’s human-centrism, which is manifest in the fixation on the developmental and learning needs of the individual child. They argue that these child-animal imbroglios, like all natureculture entanglements (Haraway, 2008), are inherently queer and reveal some of the complex layering of our co-shaped multispecies worlds.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

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animal
art production
centrism
film production
normativity
Hong Kong
education
childhood
event
learning

Citation

Taylor, A., & Blaise, M. (2014, April). Troubling the child as individual: The queer performativity of child-pet-dog entanglements. Paper presented at the 2014 AERA Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.