Trained to care: The institutionalization of nursing in Hong Kong (1887-1900)

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter scrutinizes the first nursing program in Hong Kong’s Nethersole Hospital, founded in 1887 by the London Missionary Society. Beginning with an account of the development of Christian mission hospitals in British Hong Kong, this study examines the institutionalization of the nursing profession by Protestant missionaries, and the diverse profiles and experiences of Chinese nurses. It argues that the professionally trained nurses served as cultural mediators between foreign medical missionaries and local patients, and that it contributed to the development of women’s healthcare in modern China. These nurses also carved out a separate female space to exercise their professional and moral leadership within the gender-segregated hospital institutions, and challenged the subordinate role imposed on women by traditional patriarchy. Copyright © 2019 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe church as safe haven: Christian governance in China
EditorsLars Peter LAAMANN, Joseph Tse-Hei LEE
Place of PublicationLeiden; Boston
PublisherBrill
Pages152-175
ISBN (Electronic)9789004383722
ISBN (Print)9789004383739
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018

Fingerprint

Hong Kong
Institutionalization
Nurses
Nursing
Missionaries
Mediator
Healthcare
Modern China
Patriarchy
Exercise
Christian Mission

Citation

Kang, D. J. H. (2018). Trained to care: The institutionalization of nursing in Hong Kong (1887-1900). In L. P. Laamann & J. T.-H. Lee (Eds.), The church as safe haven: Christian governance in China (pp. 152-175). Leiden; Boston: Brill.