Tracking multiple statistics: Simultaneous learning of object names and categories in English and Mandarin speakers

Chi-hsin CHEN, Lisa GERSHKOFF-STOWE, Chih-Yi WU, Hin Tat CHEUNG, Chen YU

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Two experiments were conducted to examine adult learners' ability to extract multiple statistics in simultaneously presented visual and auditory input. Experiment 1 used a cross-situational learning paradigm to test whether English speakers were able to use co-occurrences to learn word-to-object mappings and concurrently form object categories based on the commonalities across training stimuli. Experiment 2 replicated the first experiment and further examined whether speakers of Mandarin, a language in which final syllables of object names are more predictive of category membership than English, were able to learn words and form object categories when trained with the same type of structures. The results indicate that both groups of learners successfully extracted multiple levels of co-occurrence and used them to learn words and object categories simultaneously. However, marked individual differences in performance were also found, suggesting possible interference and competition in processing the two concurrent streams of regularities. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1485-1509
JournalCognitive Science
Volume41
Issue number6
Early online dateSep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2017

Citation

Chen, C.-H., Gershkoff-Stowe, L., Wu, C.-Y., Cheung, H., & Yu, C. (2017). Tracking multiple statistics: Simultaneous learning of object names and categories in English and Mandarin speakers. Cognitive Science, 41(6), 1485-1509.

Keywords

  • Statistical learning
  • Word learning
  • Category learning
  • Simultaneous processing
  • Individual differences

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