Tracking dietary sources of short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins in marine mammals through a subtropical marine food web

Lixi ZENG, Chung Wah James LAM, Hui CHEN, Bibai DU, Kenneth Mei Yee LEUNG, Paul Kwan Sing LAM

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34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our previous study revealed an elevated accumulation of short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins (MCCPs) in marine mammals from Hong Kong waters in the South China Sea. To examine the bioaccumulation potential and biomagnification in these apex predators, we sampled the dietary items of marine mammals and tracked the sources of SCCPs and MCCPs through a marine food web in this region. Sixteen fish species, seven crustacean species, and four mollusk species were collected, and the main prey species were identified for two species of marine mammals. Concentrations of ∑SCCPs and ∑MCCPs in these collected species suggested a moderate pollution level in Hong Kong waters compared to the global range. Lipid content was found to mediate congener-specific bioaccumulation in these marine species. Significantly positive correlations were observed between trophic levels and concentrations of ∑SCCPs or ∑MCCPs (p < 0.05). Trophic magnification factors for ∑SCCPs and ∑MCCPs were 4.29 and 4.79, indicating that both of them have trophic magnification potentials. Elevated biomagnification of SCCPs and MCCPs from prey species to marine mammals was observed. This is the first report of dietary source tracking of SCCPs and MCCPs in marine mammals. The elevated biomagnification between prey and marine mammals raises environmental concerns about these contaminants. Copyright © 2017 American Chemical Society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9543-9552
JournalEnvironmental Science & Technology
Volume51
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Citation

Zeng, L., Lam, J. C. W., Chen, H., Du, B., Leung, K. M. Y., & Lam, P. K. (2017). Tracking dietary sources of short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins in marine mammals through a subtropical marine food web. Environmental Science & Technology, 51(17), 9543-9552.

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