Tinnitus in adolescents: A survey of secondary school students

Research output: Contribution to conferencePapers

Abstract

Introduction: The prevalence and risk factors of tinnitus have been extensively studied in adults but only a few population studies have been performed in children or adolescents. The reported tinnitus prevalence in children and adolescents ranges from 6 to 36%. There is a large inter-study variability due to the difference in study population, definition of tinnitus, and methodologies employed. This study aims to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of tinnitus in a sample of adolescents.
Material &Method: In this cross-sectional study, 276 secondary students were surveyed for the presence of tinnitus and its impact, health factor, recreational noise exposure, psychological factor, and socioeconomic status. Tinnitus impact was measured by the Tinnitus Functional Index. All students were screened for possible hearing loss with pure-tone audiometry. Audiological information on pure-tone thresholds, tympanometry, otoacoustic emission and otoscopy were obtained in respondents who have experienced tinnitus that last more than 5 minutes in the past 12 months.
Results: 91 out of 276 students (33.0%) reported that they have experienced tinnitus. Only 6 of them (2.2% of the total sample) reported that they have experienced tinnitus that last more than 5 minutes in the past 12 months. Recreational noise exposure, ear disease, and family history are significantly associated with tinnitus.
Conclusion: The results suggest that the prevalence of tinnitus in adolescents may be overestimated. Further study in a larger sample size is needed. Copyright © 2019 TRI Conference.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - May 2019

Citation

Kam, A. (2019, May). Tinnitus in adolescents: A survey of secondary school students. Paper presented at the 12th conference of Tinnitus Research Initiatives in conjunction with 3rd Cross-Strait Tinnitus Seminar (2019 TRI), Taipei, Taiwan.

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