Thinking styles and university self-efficacy among deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing students

Sanyin CHENG, Li Fang ZHANG, Xiaozhong HU

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explores how students’ thinking styles are related to their university self-efficacy, by administering the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II and the University Self-Efficacy Scale to 366 deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) and 467 hearing university students in mainland China. Results showed that, among all participants, those with Type I styles (i.e., more creativity-generating, less structured, and cognitively more complex) had higher levels of university self-efficacy. At the same time, DHH students with Type II styles (i.e., more norm-favoring, more structured, and cognitively more simplistic) had lower levels of university self-efficacy. The contributions, limitations, and implications of the present research are discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-53
JournalJournal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016

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Self Efficacy
Hearing
self-efficacy
Students
university
student
Creativity
creativity
China
Equipment and Supplies
Thinking
Research

Citation

Cheng, S., Zhang, L.-F., & Hu, X. (2016). Thinking styles and university self-efficacy among deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing students. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 21(1), 44-53.