Thinking styles and self-determination among university students who are deaf or hard of hearing and hearing university students

Sanyin CHENG, Kuen Fung SIN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

Abstract

This study explores how students' thinking styles are related to their self-determination. The Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II and the American Institutes for Research (AIR) Self-Determination Scale were administered to 913 university students (480 who were deaf or hard-of-hearing and 433 hearing) in mainland China. Results showed that, among all participants, those with Type I styles (i.e., more creativity-generating, less structured, and cognitively more complex) had higher levels of self-determination, while those with Type II styles (i.e., more norm-favoring, more structured, and cognitively more simplistic) had lower levels of self-determination. The contributions, limitations, and implications of this study are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-69
JournalResearch in Developmental Disabilities
Volume85
Early online dateNov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

Citation

Cheng, S., & Sin, K. F. (2019). Thinking styles and self-determination among university students who are deaf or hard of hearing and hearing university students. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 85, 61-69. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2018.11.002

Keywords

  • Thinking styles
  • Self-determination
  • Deaf or hard-of-hearing

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