There is water everywhere: How news framing amplifies the effect of ecological worldviews on preference for flooding protection policy

Timothy K. F. FUNG, Dominique BROSSARD, Fung Sheung Isabella NG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine the interactive effect of worldviews and media frames on policy preference. Using flooding as a case study, we examine the interplay of ecological worldviews and news framed as either emphasizing harmony with nature or mastery over nature on individuals' preference for flood protection policy. A total of 255 undergraduate students participated in a 2 (ecological worldviews: balance-with-nature vs. human-domination-over-nature) × 2 (media frames: harmony frame vs. mastery frame) between-subjects experiment. The findings indicate that both the balance-with-nature worldview and the human-domination-over-nature worldview have significant impacts on preference for flood protection policy. Furthermore, the harmony frame amplified the effect of the balance-with-nature worldview in supporting a natural approach to flood protection. In contrast, the mastery frame amplified the effect of the human-domination-over-nature worldview on the preference for a structural approach to flood protection. Implications are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Mass Communication & Society Division.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)553-577
JournalMass Communication and Society
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Citation

Fung, T. K. F., Brossard, D., & Ng, I. (2011). There is water everywhere: How news framing amplifies the effect of ecological worldviews on preference for flooding protection policy. Mass Communication and Society, 14(5), 553-577. doi: 10.1080/15205436.2010.521291

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