The use of theory of mind (ToM) teaching programme for students

Fuk Chuen HO, Grace CHAN

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The teaching package aims to provide teachers with learning and teaching resources to enhance students with ASD social and communicative skills. Our team has developed four “Theory of Mind (ToM)” teaching packages for teachers of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) since 2000. The most current teaching package is designed to help children with ASD to differentiate and manage their own emotions, as well as to read other people’s emotions on an interactive computer-based mode. The design is based on the idea of ‘mind-reading’ and the exercises are arranged in different stages, from the recognition of a range of emotions to the reaction to encountered emotions. The teaching package consists of 5 basic games and 95 animation stories in 4 kinds of environments, i.e., domestic, school, community and leisure. In this project, we have designed 5 follow-up activities in each story to analyze the social behavior of the main and supporting characters. The most significant follow-up activity is the use of ‘Think Grid’ to identify the most appropriate solution to the encountered social or communicative problems. Students are required to opt for one of the four choices, i.e., “I win you win’; “I win, you lose”; “I lose, you win” and “I lose, you lose’. This is useful for students to learn to react to the encountered emotions in an acceptable manner. Teachers’ feedback about the effectiveness of the teaching package was positive.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - May 2017

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theory of teaching
teaching program
emotion
autism
Teaching
student
teacher
social behavior
resources
school
learning
community

Citation

Ho, F.-c., & Chan, G. (2017, May). The use of theory of mind (ToM) teaching programme for students. Paper presented at the Redesigning Pedagogy International Conference 2017: Education for the future: Creativity, innovation, values, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

Keywords

  • Interventions
  • Special education