The story of two administrative states: State capacity in Hong Kong and Singapore

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Abstract

Hong Kong and Singapore are both typical administrative states with an efficient administration and a vibrant market, which had achieved rapid economic growth in the past decades. This article examines the trajectory of their state capacity, highlighting recent problems and challenges. Based on a conceptual framework that captures and links up four dimensions - namely polity, bureaucracy, economy and civil society - their commonalities and differences in response are discussed. Their experience should be of particular relevance to transitional authoritarian states in Asia such as China, which faces similar challenges to reform in the arenas of politics, administration, economics and society. Copyright © 2008 Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121-145
JournalThe Pacific Review
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2008

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Singapore
Hong Kong
bureaucracy
civil society
economic growth
reform
China
economy
politics
market
economics
experience
Group
Society

Citation

Cheung, A. B. L. (2008). The story of two administrative states: State capacity in Hong Kong and Singapore. The Pacific Review, 21(2), 121-145.

Keywords

  • Administrative state
  • State capacity
  • Hong Kong
  • Singapore
  • Institutional
  • Logic
  • Re-institutionalization
  • Strategic linkages