The shifting locus of musical experience from performance to recording to new media: Some implications for music education

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

When stories of music in the 20th Century are told, the importance of sound recordings will be central to their plots. Certain concerts will, of course, also be remembered, such as the 1913 Paris premiere of the Rite of Spring, Marian Anderson’s 1939 recital on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, and the Woodstock Music and Art Fair of 1969. But it is impossible to think about music of the past hundred years without an essential place for recordings: Enrico Caruso’s 78s, Louis Armstrong’s Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings, the ten thousand recordings made by Duke Ellington, and the Beatles and the British Invasion. Recordings also afforded musical realms built from recordings, such as hip-hop sampling and techno music. The more recent extension of recordings into new media represents the latest extension of the possibilities of circulation and creation via sound recording. One cannot credibly tell the story of our century’s music without sound recordings, the emergence of which is the central concern of the present article. Copyright © 2015 Taylor & Francis .
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMusic education: Navigating the future
EditorsClint RANDLES
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherRoutledge
Pages63-90
ISBN (Electronic)9781317692171, 9781315777009
ISBN (Print)9781138022584, 1138022586
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Locus
New Media
Music Education
Music
Sound Recording
Recital
Memorial
Duke Ellington
Hip-hop
Concert
Art Fairs
Invasion
The Beatles
Premiere
Rite of Spring
Plot
Sampling

Citation

Thibeault, M. (2015). The shifting locus of musical experience from performance to recording to new media: Some implications for music education. In C. Randles (Ed.), Music education: Navigating the future (pp. 63-90). New York: Routledge.