The relative effects of focused and unfocused direct written corrective feedback on the accurate use of English articles in Hong Kong primary ESL context

Vanessa Kristia CHEUNG

Research output: Other contributionHonours Projects

Abstract

This research report presents the findings of a study that investigated (1) the effects of written corrective feedback (CF) on Hong Kong primary learners’ use of English indefinite and definite articles in terms of first and second mention; and (2) whether there are differences in the effects of focused and unfocused direct written corrective feedback on the same target structure in an English as a second language (ESL) context. Seventeen Primary five students formed a control group (N = 5) and two experimental groups: focused CF group (N = 6) and unfocused CF group (N = 6). In form of a pre-test–immediate post-test–delayed post-tests design, all three groups wrote narrative stories, completed error correction tests and an exit questionnaire. The focused group received corrections exclusively on article errors while the unfocused group received corrections on all kinds of errors. All groups gained improvements in both tests, showing the significant main effect of time. These two types of CF were equally effective. Overall, the results suggested that CF is of high value to language acquisition and reinforces teachers’ current practice of providing CF.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Written corrective feedback
  • Error correction
  • Focused and unfocused feedback
  • Honours Project (HP)
  • Bachelor of Education (Honours) (English Language) (Five-year Full-time)
  • Programme code: A5B059
  • Course code: ENG4903

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