The precision of estimating the total energy demand: Implications for the determination of the accumulated oxygen deficit

Aaron RUSSELL, Peter LE ROSSIGNOL, Sing Kai LO

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11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study observed the precision of estimating the total energy demand required to calculate the AOD using three different VO2 - power regressions which included, five VO2 - power regression points and a forced y-intercept of 5.1 ml/kg/min (5+Y) (1), five VO2 - power regression points without a forced y-intercept of 5.1 ml/kg/min (5-Y), Medbø's "procedure 3" (MED) (1). Fourteen well-trained schoolboy rowers completed a 2000-m performance test, VO2peak test, five submaximal tests, and an exhaustive 2-min test using rowing ergometry. There were no differences between the estimated total energy demand (ETED), AOD and slope of the regression lines when established from either of the three regression equations. The regressions developed from methods 5+Y and MED reduced the length of the 95% confidence interval (95% CI) (p<0.0167) compared to the method 5-Y. 2000-m rowing ergometer performance was significantly predicted by VO2peak and the AOD determined by either of methods 5+Y (p = 0.047) and MED (p = 0.042). The inclusion of a y-intercept value when estimating the total energy demand with a reduced number of regression points reduces the length of the 95% CI, increases the precision of the estimated value and therefore reduces the variability of the AOD measurement. It is suggested that the length of the 95% CI of the ETED be used as a criteria to measure the degree of precision in the estimated value. This approach has potential for improving the reproducibility of the AOD. Copyright © 2000 American Society of Exercise Physiologists. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-63
JournalJournal of Exercise Physiology Online
Volume3
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2000

Citation

Russell, A., Le Rossignol, P., & Lo, S. K. (2000). The precision of estimating the total energy demand: Implications for the determination of the accumulated oxygen deficit. Journal of Exercise Physiology Online, 3(2), 55-63.

Keywords

  • Rowing performance
  • 95% confidence interval
  • Intense exercise

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