The Paradox of China's wage system reforms: Balancing stakeholders' rationalities

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Abstract

This article examines the pattern of China's wage system reforms in the post-1978 era and evaluates the policy outcomes. It is found that there are considerable gaps between reform objectives in favour of promoting productivity and merit differentiating and the real consequences which have remained egalitarian. The authors argue that such discrepancies can be explained with reference to the interactive nature of policy implementation in China which, in this case, involves striking a delicate balance among three major stakeholder levels: central policymakers, local officials and managers, and rank-and-file cadres, each seeking to optimize three rationalities: economic, bureaucratic, and social distribution. Copyright © 2001 ProQuest Information and Learning. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)491-521
JournalPublic Administration Quarterly
Volume24
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Citation

Cheung, A. B. L., & Poon, K. K. (2000). The Paradox of China's wage system reforms: Balancing stakeholders' rationalities. Public Administration Quarterly, 24(4), 491-521.

Keywords

  • Civil service
  • Economic reform
  • Economic systems
  • Government reform
  • Subsidies
  • Wage differential
  • Uniformity
  • Productivity

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