The myth of multiculturalism in ‘Asia's world city’: Incomprehensive policies for ethnic minorities in Hong Kong

Kam Yee LAW, Kim Ming LEE

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26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Branded by its government as ‘Asia’s world city’, Hong Kong is described as ‘an open, tolerant and pluralistic community, and a city rich in culture and tradition’. However, beneath this ‘harmony’ lies the fact that majority of Hong Kong Chinese socially exclude many South Asian ethnic groups. The Hong Kong government similarly lacks a multicultural policy that encourages its citizens to respect other races and provides resources for ethnic groups to cultivate and maintain their well-being and cultural identities. In this article, the authors will probe into the actual depth of the Hong Kong public and government’s self-image of diversity and tolerance and determine whether another reality is hidden behind the beautiful exposition. A discussion follows on the changed or unchanged scenarios influenced by public policies for ethnic minorities, who regard the city as their second home or were born here, since Hong Kong returned to China. Although Hong Kong has been handed over to China for 15 years, the legacy of colonialism is found to be apparent when we attempt to critically review the plight of ethnic minorities in the city through the framework of multiculturalism. Copyright © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-134
JournalJournal of Asian Public Policy
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

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multicultural society
national minority
Hong Kong
myth
ethnic group
second home
China
cultural identity
colonial age
self-image
tolerance
respect
public policy
well-being
scenario
citizen
lack
resources
community
Group

Citation

Law, K.-Y., & Lee, K.-M. (2012). The myth of multiculturalism in ‘Asia's world city’: Incomprehensive policies for ethnic minorities in Hong Kong. Journal of Asian Public Policy, 5(1), 117-134.

Keywords

  • Colonialism
  • Ethnic minorities
  • Multiculturalism
  • Sinicization
  • Social exclusion