The moderated associations of self-compassion with physiological and psychological stress responses: Comparisons between cancer caregivers and non-caregivers

Edward Wai Wa CHAN, Li LIANG, Nancy Huinan LIU, Wai Kai HOU

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

Self-compassion has been shown to be protective against stress. Whether its stress buffering effect differs between cancer caregivers and non-caregivers is unknown. This study examined the moderating effect of self-compassion among cancer caregivers relative to non-caregivers by recruiting cancer caregivers from the hospital and a community sample matching on sex and age. Participants completed a questionnaire which comprised the self-reported anxiety (STAI-6) and self-compassion (SCS-SF) measures, and administered cortisol sample collections with Salivette tubes at home. Whereas caregivers experienced higher diurnal cortisol level, the differential protective effects of self-compassion were only present against anxiety symptoms but not physiological stress. Copyright © 2021 The Author(s).
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Early online dateJul 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Jul 2021

Citation

Chan, E. W. W., Liang, L., Liu, N. H., & Hou, W.-K. (2021). The moderated associations of self-compassion with physiological and psychological stress responses: Comparisons between cancer caregivers and non-caregivers. Journal of Health Psychology. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/13591053211030994

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Caregivers
  • Empathy
  • Physiological stress
  • Self-compassion

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The moderated associations of self-compassion with physiological and psychological stress responses: Comparisons between cancer caregivers and non-caregivers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.