The involvement of morphological information in the memorization of Chinese compound words: Evidence from memory errors

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Abstract

The processing of morphological information during Chinese word memorization was investigated in the present study. Participants were asked to study words presented to them on a computer screen in the studying phase and then judge whether presented words were old or new in the test phase. In addition to parent words (i.e. the words studied in the study phase), the test phase also included conjunction lures (constructed out of morphemes in the parent words) and new words (constructed out of entirely new morphemes). Three kinds of words (i.e. subordinate compounds, coordinative compounds, and single-morpheme words) were involved. In both two experiments, performance on lures worsened when both parent words and lures were coordinative compounds, compared to the condition when both were subordinate compounds. The different performance between compounds with different compounding structures in the test phase suggests the involvement of morphological information in the memorization of Chinese compound words. The spreading activation theory for memory and the interactive activation model for the processing of morphologically complex words were referred to for interpreting the results. Copyright © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media New York.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-176
JournalJournal of Psycholinguistic Research
Volume45
Issue number1
Early online dateNov 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2016

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Automatic Data Processing
parents
activation
evidence
performance
new media
experiment
science
Memorization
Compound Words
Memory Errors

Citation

Liu, D. (2016). The involvement of morphological information in the memorization of Chinese compound words: Evidence from memory errors. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 45(1), 157-176.

Keywords

  • Morphological structure
  • Memory error paradigm
  • Lexical processing