The influence of cultural lay beliefs: Dialecticism and indecisiveness in European Canadians and Hong Kong Chinese

Man Wai LI, Takahiko MASUDA, Matthew J. RUSSELL

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous findings in cultural psychology suggest that East Asians are more likely than North Americans to view the world dialectically and that this dialectic view of the world affects their psychological tendencies. Extending these findings, our research examined the relationship between dialecticism and indecisiveness in European Canadians and Hong Kong Chinese. Evidence from three studies demonstrated that: Hong Kong Chinese were more indecisive than European Canadians and that dialecticism mediated this cultural difference (Study 1), dialectically primed individuals were more likely than non-dialectically primed individuals to experience indecisiveness (Study 2), and decisions’ importance affected cultural variations: no cultural difference in indecisiveness was found for important decisions, with Hong Kong Chinese reporting a higher level of indecisiveness for less important decisions compared to European Canadians. Furthermore, the cultural variation for less important decisions was mediated by dialecticism (Study 3). The importance of studying decision making processes across cultures is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-12
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume68
Early online dateMay 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Citation

Li, L. M. W., Masuda, T., & Russell, M. J. (2014). The influence of cultural lay beliefs: Dialecticism and indecisiveness in European Canadians and Hong Kong Chinese. Personality and Individual Differences, 68, 6-12. doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2014.03.047

Keywords

  • Culture
  • Dialecticism
  • Indecisiveness
  • Decision-making

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