The inessive structure in archaic and medieval Chinese: An evolutionary study of inessive demonstrative uses from archaic to early modern Chinese

Qingzhi ZHU, Wenjie CHEN

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Location is an important category of space. In Chinese, from the times of Oracle-bone inscriptions to now, one of the means used to indicate space or location is the demonstrative pronoun. But before the medieval period there only was one kind of demonstrative pronoun which can be both used to demonstrate person and location. During the medieval period, an evolution occurred in the Chinese demonstrative pronoun system. In the pre-modern period Chinese had developed a system of inessive demonstrative pronoun, such as zhèlĭ 這裡 ‘here’, nàlĭ 那裡 ‘there’, zhèbiān 這邊 ‘this side’, nàbiān 那邊 ‘that side’, which are special demonstrative pronouns used only to indicate space and location. This paper focuses on the evolution and tries to answer the following questions: how did the evolution occur? What is the reason of the evolution? Copyright © 2008 Springer Science + Business Media B.V.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSpace in languages of China: Cross-linguistic, synchronic and diachronic perspectives
EditorsDan XU
Place of PublicationDordrecht
PublisherSpringer
Pages249-266
ISBN (Electronic)9781402083211
ISBN (Print)9781402083204
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Citation

Zhu, Q., & Chen, W. (2008). The inessive structure in archaic and medieval Chinese: An evolutionary study of inessive demonstrative uses from archaic to early modern Chinese. In D. Xu (Ed.), Space in languages of China: Cross-linguistic, synchronic and diachronic perspectives (pp. 249-266). Dordrecht: Springer.

Keywords

  • GDP
  • IDP
  • Evolution
  • Medieval Chinese
  • Chinese translations of Buddhist scripture

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The inessive structure in archaic and medieval Chinese: An evolutionary study of inessive demonstrative uses from archaic to early modern Chinese'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.