The individualist? The autonomy of reason in Kant’s philosophy and educational views

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Immanuel Kant is often viewed by educational theorists as an individualist, who put education on “an individual track,” paving the way for political liberal conceptions of education such as that of John Rawls. One can easily find evidence for such a view, in “Answer to the Question: ‘What is Enlightenment?’,” as well as in his more metaphysical, moral inquiries. However, the place of reason in Kant’s philosophy––what I call the “autonomy of reason”––spells out a negative rather than positive conception of freedom, from which stems a less individualistic or political liberal education than many presume. I cite both well known and lesser known works in the essay to demonstrate that Kant defended universal freedom only as a means towards developing the “autonomy of reason”, and I consider comparatively the education it entails with that spelled out by Rawls, despite the common conflation of the two. Copyright © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-344
JournalStudies in Philosophy and Education
Volume26
Issue number4
Early online date02 Jun 2007
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2007

Citation

Jackson, L. (2007). The individualist? The autonomy of reason in Kant’s philosophy and educational views. Studies in Philosophy and Education, 26(4), 335-344. doi: 10.1007/s11217-007-9045-3

Keywords

  • Kant
  • Education
  • Philosophy
  • Rawls
  • Kantianism
  • Constructivism
  • Methodology
  • Epistemology
  • Public education
  • State
  • Liberalism

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