The impact of working from home during COVID-19 on work and life domains: An exploratory study on Hong Kong

Lina VYAS, Nantapong BUTAKHIEO

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pandemic sweeping the world, COVID-19, has rendered a large proportion of the workforce unable to commute to work, as to mitigate the spread of the virus. This has resulted in both employers and employees seeking alternative work arrangements, especially in a fast-paced metropolitan like Hong Kong. Due to the pandemic, most if not all workers experienced work from home (WFH). Hence WFH has become a policy priority for most governments. In doing so, the policies must be made keeping in mind the practicality for both employers and employees. However, this current situation provides unique insight into how well working from home works, and may play a vital role in future policies that reshape the current structure of working hours, possibly allowing for more flexibility. Using an exploratory framework and a SWOT analysis, this study investigates the continuing experience of the employer and employees face in Hong Kong. A critical insight and related recommendations have been developed for future policy decisions. It will also critically investigate if this work arrangement will remain as a transitory element responding to the exceptional circumstances, or whether it could be a permanent arrangement. Copyright © 2020 The Author(s).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-76
JournalPolicy Design and Practice
Volume4
Issue number1
Early online date23 Dec 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Citation

Vyas, L., & Butakhieo, N. (2021). The impact of working from home during COVID-19 on work and life domains: An exploratory study on Hong Kong. Policy Design and Practice, 4(1), 59-76. doi: 10.1080/25741292.2020.1863560

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • Work-life balance
  • Work from home
  • Hong Kong

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