The impact of experienced discrimination and self-stigma on sleep and health-related quality of life among individuals with mental disorders in Hong Kong

Ka Shing Kevin CHAN, Tsz Wa FUNG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: For many individuals with mental disorders, stigma may represent a potent stressor that can disrupt sleep and impair health and quality of life. In this study, we tested a stigma model of sleep health, hypothesizing that public stigma (as indicated by experienced discrimination) and internalized stigma (as indicated by self-stigma content and process) would affect sleep and, in turn, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among individuals with mental disorders.
Methods: A total of 282 individuals with mental disorders from Hong Kong, China, completed questionnaire measures of experienced discrimination, self-stigma content and process, sleep disturbance, and physical and mental HRQoL. Structural equation modeling and Bootstrap analyses were conducted to analyze the relations among the variables.
Results: Structural equation modeling showed that experienced discrimination was positively associated with self-stigma content and process, which were, in turn, linked to greater sleep disturbance and consequently poorer physical and mental HRQoL. Bootstrap analyses further demonstrated that experienced discrimination had significant indirect effects on sleep disturbance, via self-stigma content and process, and on physical and mental HRQoL, via self-stigma content and process and sleep disturbance.
Conclusions: Theoretically, this study highlighted the importance of considering the contributions of both public and internalized stigma, and differentiating between self-stigma content and process, when evaluating the sleep quality and health status of individuals with mental disorders. Practically, this study pointed to the necessity of developing anti-stigma and anti-self-stigma interventions at societal and individual levels in order to reduce stigma-related stress and improve sleep and health outcomes among individuals with mental disorders. Copyright © 2019 Springer Nature Switzerland AG.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2171–2182
JournalQuality of Life Research
Volume28
Issue number8
Early online dateApr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019

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Hong Kong
Mental Disorders
Sleep
Quality of Life
Mental Health
Physical Phenomena
Health
Health Status
China
Public Health

Citation

Chan, K. K. S., & Fung, W. T. W. (2019). The impact of experienced discrimination and self-stigma on sleep and health-related quality of life among individuals with mental disorders in Hong Kong. Quality of Life Research, 28(8), 2171–2182. doi: 10.1007/s11136-019-02181-1

Keywords

  • Discrimination
  • Self-stigma
  • Sleep disturbance
  • Health-related quality of life
  • Mental disorders