The engagement of minority and immigrant adolescents with school and civic society in Hong Kong

Kerry John KENNEDY, Yan Wing LEUNG, Chi Keung Alan CHEUNG

Research output: Contribution to conferencePapers

Abstract

This paper reports the findings of a public policy research supported by the University Grant Council on the relationships between the characteristics, school engagement and civic engagement of adolescents in Hong Kong. Data was collected from a sample of 3,024 students, aged 12 to 19, by employing the self-rated modified school engagement scale and the ICCS 2009 student questionnaires. Using local Hong Kong students as a reference, the other students included in the study were non-Chinese South Asians, cross-boundary students who live in Mainland China but who go to schools in Hong Kong, and newly arrived students from Mainland China. Family income and student groups were two predictor variables examined. About 38% of the sample were of low socioeconomic status, in that they reported their family monthly income as being less than 1500 USD. Hierarchical regression was employed to determine the relative influence of student characteristics and school and civic engagement variables. Findings revealed that there was a close connection between the self-assessment of school and civic engagement and there were differences in this regard among the immigrant and minority student groups. Recommendations for both schools and government agencies towards future policy development in facilitating pro-school and civic-oriented attitudes and behaviours of all students were suggested.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

Citation

Kennedy, K., Leung, Y. W., & Cheung, A. (2013, July). The engagement of minority and immigrant adolescents with school and civic society in Hong Kong. Paper presented at the First International Congress Students’ Engagement in School: Perspectives of Psychology and Education, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.

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