The effects of misleading and inconsistent postevent information on children's recollections of criterion-learned information

Kerry LEE, Kay BUSSEY

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Similar experimental procedures are used in misinformation studies and in retroactive inhibition studies. Despite these similarities, the findings of these studies have suggested that misleading postevent information and inconsistent postevent information would have different effects on children's recollections. To examine this hypothesis, 28 seven-year-olds learned a target game to criterion. Two days later, they were administered either type of postevent information on either one or three occasions. When the children were tested 3 weeks later, the results showed that even criterion-learned information could be affected detrimentally by exposure to misleading or inconsistent postevent information. Notably, children who were administered misinformation on one occasion reported more target information than children in all other groups. It is suggested that exposure to misinformation had a facilitative effect on these children's recollections. Copyright © 1999 by Academic Press.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-182
JournalJournal of Experimental Child Psychology
Volume73
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

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Communication
Inhibition (Psychology)

Citation

Lee, K., & Bussey, K. (1999). The effects of misleading and inconsistent postevent information on children's recollections of criterion-learned information. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 73(3), 161-182. doi: 10.1006/jecp.1999.2501

Keywords

  • Children's memory
  • Misinformation
  • Retroactive inhibition
  • Forgetting