The effect of provided and self-requested knowledge of performance on acquisition and transfer performance of an open sport skill in college students

John LIU, Huijung FU, Shihui CHEN, Fengru SHEU

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Male and female college students (N = 68) were randomly assigned to one of three knowledge of performance (KP) groups: Provided-KP, Self-Requested KP, and No- KP. Participants performed a table tennis backhand returning task on a pretest and then 25 practice trials of the task under their respective feedback conditions. A transfer test was administered to all participants after completion of the practice trials. The result of a 2 x 3 x 5 (Gender x Feedback x Trial Block) factorial ANOVA indicated that all participants improved significantly across trial blocks (p = .02). The result of a 2 x 3 (Gender x Feedback) ANOVA revealed a significant (p = .032) Gender x Feedback interaction effect on the transfer test. Male participants had significantly (p = .02) higher performance accuracy than female participants in the No-KP group on the transfer test. The present findings show no clear enhancing effect of self-requested feedback on motor skill learning but suggest that differences in using feedback during the learning of an open sport skill may exist between male and female learners. Copyright © 2014 The Asian Council of Exercise and Sports Science.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-55
JournalAsian Journal of Exercise & Sports Science
Volume11
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Citation

Lui, J., Fu, H. J., Chen, S.-h.,& Sheu, F.-r (2014). The effect of provided and self-requested knowledge of performance on acquisition and transfer performance of an open sport skill in college students, Asian Journal of Exercise & Sports Science, 11(2), 46-55.

Keywords

  • Knowledge of performance
  • Open sport skill
  • Transfer performance

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of provided and self-requested knowledge of performance on acquisition and transfer performance of an open sport skill in college students'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.