The development and correlates of gender role attitudes in African American youth

Chun Bun Ian LAM, Christine STANIK, Susan M. MCHALE

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research examined the longitudinal trajectories and family correlates of gender role attitudes in African American youth in a sample of 166 sibling pairs residing with their mothers and fathers. Multilevel modelling revealed that (1) girls and boys exhibited significant declines in gender attitude traditionality from ages 9 to 15 that levelled off through age 18, (2) mothers’ (but not fathers’) gender role attitude traditionality was positively related to youth's attitude traditionality, and (3) within-person variation in mothers’ (but not fathers’) racial discrimination experiences was negatively related to within-person variation in youth's gender role attitude traditionality. The utility of applying a cultural ecological framework within an ethnic homogenous, accelerated longitudinal design to understand African American family processes, in conjunction with the intersectionality between race and gender, is the focus of the discussion. Copyright © 2017 The British Psychological Society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)406-419
JournalBritish Journal of Developmental Psychology
Volume35
Issue number3
Early online dateFeb 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2017

Citation

Lam, C. B., Stanik, C., & McHale, S. M. (2017). The development and correlates of gender role attitudes in African American youth. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 35(3), 406-419.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The development and correlates of gender role attitudes in African American youth'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.