The contributions of separate pinyin skills and oral vocabulary to Chinese word reading of U.S. Mandarin immersion third graders

Zhongkui JU, Yanling ZHOU, Robert DELMAS

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

The present study aimed to examine the contributions of two separate Pinyin skills and oral vocabulary to Chinese word reading of 70 third graders in a U.S. Mandarin Immersion program where Pinyin was introduced at Grade 3. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that Pinyin initial-final spelling—the skill to spell Chinese syllables using Pinyin letters—and oral vocabulary were uniquely associated with Chinese word reading, after accounting for the effects of phonological awareness and the other Pinyin skill of tone identification. The variance in Chinese word reading explained by tone identification was fully accounted for by oral vocabulary, Pinyin initial–final spelling, and phonological awareness, suggesting that tone identification might involve both phonology- and meaning-related processes. Oral vocabulary and tone identification explained more shared variance in Chinese word reading than the two code-related skills of phonological awareness and Pinyin initial-final spelling. The importance of meaning-related skills in learning the deep orthography of Chinese characters for Chinese L2 young learners is discussed. Copyright © 2021 The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V.
Original languageEnglish
JournalReading and Writing
Early online date29 Mar 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29 Mar 2021

Citation

Ju, Z., Zhou, Y., & delMas, R. (2021). The contributions of separate pinyin skills and oral vocabulary to Chinese word reading of U.S. Mandarin immersion third graders. Reading and Writing. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s11145-021-10150-9

Keywords

  • Pinyin skills
  • Oral vocabulary
  • Chinese word reading
  • Hierarchical regression analysis
  • Mandarin immersion

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