The concerns of mainstream teachers: Coping with inclusivity in an Australian context

Christine Irene FORLIN, Margaret KEEN, Emma BARRETT

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Throughout the past two decades there has been a move away from educating children with disabilities in segregated schools to adopting a more inclusive approach within mainstream schools in all jurisdictions in Australia. This research identifies the concerns of 228 regular class teachers in Western Australia who have all been involved with the inclusion of a child with an intellectual disability in their classrooms. Seven categories of concerns are investigated together with the use and effectiveness of a range of coping strategies. Demographic differences in age, year level being taught, qualifications, teaching experience and previous involvement with inclusion were found regarding concerns about inclusion. The discussion focuses on the relevance of professional development and the need to ensure that it targets the specific concerns of teachers, focusing on the coping strategies recognised as being most useful in order to provide optimal conditions for success. Copyright © 2008 Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-264
JournalInternational Journal of Disability, Development and Education
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008

Fingerprint

Disabled Children
coping
inclusion
Western Australia
teacher
disability
Intellectual Disability
Teaching
Demography
school
qualification
jurisdiction
Research
classroom
experience
Group

Citation

Forlin, C., Keen, M., & Barrett, E. (2008). The concerns of mainstream teachers: Coping with inclusivity in an Australian context. International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 55(3), 251-264.

Keywords

  • Australia
  • Coping strategies
  • Inclusion
  • Intellectual disability
  • Mainstream
  • Teacher concerns