The comparison of activated and digested sludge applied to flowering Chinese cabbage, brassica parachinensis bailey

Ming Hung WONG, Sau-Wah YIP

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Abstract

Seedlings of the Chinese White Cabbage, Brassica parachinensis were grown in garden soil alone, and with two kinds of sludge, namely activated and digested sludge with 1:500 and 2:500 (dry weight) application rates, respectively. 

The results showed a positive effect with the addition of both types of sludge at the 1:500 and a negative effect at the 2:500, This was indicated by the total dry weight after the seedlings had been cultured for a period of 30 days. 

Foliar analyses of the plants revealed a significantly higher uptake of Cd (P(0.01) in the activated sludge amended-soil and both Cd and Mn (P(0.0l) in the digested sludge amended-soil at 1:500 application rates when compared with those grown in the garden soil alone. More heavy metals were transferred to the leaf tissues at the 2:500 application rate. However, the crops in all the pots showed no visual metal toxicity symptoms, possibly due to the short growing period and the comparatively lower content of heavy metal in the sludge. 

Land application of the sludge at a smaller amount increased the soil fertility level and a higher amount depressed the growth of the crops as indicated by the lower productivity. This was mainly due to the higher uptake of various heavy metals. The need to evaluate the possibility of toxic effects through the human food chain is urged. Copyright © 1978 Informa UK Limited.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-251
JournalJournal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Environmental Science and Engineering
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1978

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Soils
Heavy metals
Crops
Toxicity
Productivity
Tissue
Metals

Bibliographical note

Wong, M.‐H., & Yip, S.‐W. (1978). The comparison of activated and digested sludge applied to flowering Chinese cabbage, brassica parachinensis bailey. Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Environmental Science and Engineering, 13(3), 241-251. doi: 10.1080/10934527809374807