The changing concept of social education in the primary school curriculum

Sum Cho PO, Jun FANG

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Although educators have not come to an agreed single definition on social education, this area of learning is often used synonymously for citizenship education. With the reunification of Hong Kong and China, the preparation for "good citizens" has received increasing attention by both the general public and the practitioners. A deep understanding of social education is undoubtedly necessary. This chapter attempts to describe the evolution of the concept of social education in the Hong Kong educational setting and identify its major characteristics through a comparative study of the syllabi of related subjects published at different periods of time (Social Studies in 1967 and 1980 and General Studies in 1994 and 1997). The concept of social education as reflected in these curriculum documents is critically examined and evaluated in the light of the local context, the different perspectives on curriculum development, and its recent developments in the US. Implications for the implementation and effectiveness of citizenship education in Hong Kong primary schools are discussed. Copyright © 2000 The Hong Kong Institute of Education.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSchool curriculum change and development in Hong Kong
EditorsYin Cheong CHENG, King Wai CHOW, Kwok Tung TSUI
Place of PublicationHong Kong
PublisherThe Hong Kong Institute of Education
Pages571-591
ISBN (Print)9629490285
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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primary school
curriculum
Hong Kong
education
citizenship
reunification
educational setting
syllabus
social studies
curriculum development
educator
citizen
China
learning

Citation

Po, S. C., & Fang, J. (2000). The changing concept of social education in the primary school curriculum. In Y. C. Cheng, K. W. Chow, & K. T. Tsui (Eds.), School curriculum change and development in Hong Kong (pp. 571-591). Hong Kong: The Hong Kong Institute of Education.