Teaching students with intellectual disabilities: A hermeneutic phenomenological study of the experiences of visual arts teachers

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Abstract

This paper reports on a hermeneutic phenomenological study on the experiences of visual arts teachers teaching students with intellectual disabilities in Hong Kong. Themes which emerged from the interviews were examined in conjunction with the lived experiences of the teachers. Special school visual arts teachers who participated in this study have strong emotional and personal connections with their students. The teachers had experienced difficulties when teaching their students and many of the problems were unique to the special school settings. In an effort to tackle these problems and improve their teaching, these teachers engaged in reflection and explored a variety of ways to enhance their students' learning. In spite of the practical learning problems their students face, the teachers maintained that studying visual arts is beneficial to their students 'whole-person development. The paper concludes with a critical reflection on the nature of teaching visual arts to students with intellectual disabilities. Copyright © 2015 Australian Association of Special Education Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-12
JournalSpecial Education Perspectives
Volume24
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Citation

Tam, C.-O. (2015). Teaching students with intellectual disabilities: A hermeneutic phenomenological study of the experiences of visual arts teachers. Special Education Perspectives, 24(2), 5-12.

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