Teaching students from other cultures: An exploration of language teachers' experiences with ethnic minority students

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reports on a qualitative study investigating a group of novice ESL teachers' teaching experiences with ethnic minority students in secondary schools in Hong Kong. It finds that, while teachers argue that society has not been tolerant enough of ethnic minorities, they nonetheless believe that ethnic minorities should comply with societal expectations in order to gain respect and more opportunities. In passing judgement on ethnic minority students' learning style and life attitudes, and in urging that they be changed, the teachers have, perhaps unconsciously, perpetuated and reified underlying societal stereotypes. It is found that the accented English spoken by ethnic minority students has been devalued and delegitimized, which may disempower them in educational settings and prevent them from expressing and defending their ideas. Implications for education pre-service and novice ESL teachers working with ethnically diverse students are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Taylor & Francis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-15
JournalJournal of Language, Identity, and Education
Volume17
Issue number1
Early online dateJan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Citation

Gu, M. (2018). Teaching students from other cultures: An exploration of language teachers' experiences with ethnic minority students. Journal of Language, Identity & Education, 17(1), 1-15. doi: 10.1080/15348458.2017.1381566

Keywords

  • Disempowerment
  • ESL teachers
  • Ethnic minority students
  • Professional identity
  • Second language teaching

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Teaching students from other cultures: An exploration of language teachers' experiences with ethnic minority students'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.