Teaching policy analysis in China and the United States: Implications for curriculum design of public policy programs

Jingwei Alex HE, Allan LAI, Xun WU

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rapid worldwide growth in public policy education now offers excellent opportunities to assess the development of the field from a comparative perspective. Our analysis, which examines recent trends in public policy education by comparing public policy analysis courses taught in professional degree programs in China and in the United States, reveals considerable disparities in these curricula as taught in the two countries. Surprisingly, these differences have emerged primarily through disciplinary foci, expertise in policy analysis, and practical experience among instructors, rather than through the distinctive social, political, institutional, and historical characteristics of the two countries. Our findings also suggest that a positivist approach to policy analysis continues to dominate classroom discussions in US programs, despite intense debates in the literature regarding the utility of that approach in guiding actual practice. Copyright © 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Policy and Society Associates (APSS).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)385-396
JournalPolicy and Society
Volume35
Issue number4
Early online dateNov 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

Citation

He, A. J., Lai, A., & Wu, X. (2016). Teaching policy analysis in China and the United States: Implications for curriculum design of public policy programs. Policy and Society, 35(4), 385-396.

Keywords

  • Policy analysis
  • Curriculum design
  • China
  • Comparative analysis
  • Positivism
  • Policy education

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