Teachers' multicultural sensitivity predicts developmentally appropriate beliefs and practices in the classroom

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Abstract

Purpose - In the current study, the author tests a conceptual model in which teachers' knowledge and skills of multiculturalism and teaching relationship (cultural harmony) are associated with developmentally appropriate practices (DAPs), developmentally appropriate (DABs), developmentally inappropriate beliefs and developmentally inappropriate practices (DIPs) in the classroom.
Design/methodology/approach - Participants were 347 preschool teachers from 12 preschools including 342 women ( 98.6%) and five men (1.4%) aged 24–45 years located across all five districts of Hong Kong. The hypothesized model of multicultural teaching competency as a predictor of DABs and DAPs is confirmed in the present study.
Findings - Multicultural teaching knowledge can enhance developmentally appropriate teaching beliefs and practices and reduce DIPs. It is highly recommended that multicultural education can be embedded in early childhood education (ECE) programs for both in-service and preservice teachers.
Originality/value - A new conceptual model of teachers' knowledge and skills of multiculturalism and teaching relationship (cultural harmony) associated with DABs, developmentally inappropriate beliefs and DAPs in the classroom was firstly examined. Copyright © 2020 Emerald Publishing Limited.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAsian Education and Development Studies
Early online date16 Nov 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 16 Nov 2020

Citation

Leung, C. H. (2020). Teachers' multicultural sensitivity predicts developmentally appropriate beliefs and practices in the classroom. Asian Education and Development Studies. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1108/AEDS-09-2020-0201

Keywords

  • Multiculturalism
  • Developmentally appropriate beliefs
  • Multicultural teaching competency

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