Teachers and promotion: Research evidence on the role of gender, career intentions, promotion criteria and teacher satisfaction

Ping Man WONG

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Many occupations and all professions offer their recruits the opportunity of pursuing a career, in the sense that individuals can be promoted through a clearly delineated promotions hierarchy. This aspect of a career is referred as its vertical mobility dimension (Ladinsky, 1963; Maclean, 1992). Promotion can therefore be regarded as the passage to a higher rank. In management, promotion is one of the reinforcers of the rewards system to help motivating employees. Other rewards include pay, recognition, desirable work assignments, autonomy and participation (Robbins & Coulter, 2002). From a motivation perspective, if rewards are allocated only on non-performance factors, such as seniority, job title, or across-the-board pay raises, employees are likely to reduce their efforts. As stated by the Peter Principle (Peter Hull, 1969), in a hierarchy using promotion solely as a reward for good performance, people tend to rise to their level of competence because good performance in one job is no guarantee of good performance in another. That is why the pay-for-performance programmes or compensation plans are gaining in popularity. Copyright © 2009 Springer Science + Business Media, LLC.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational handbook of research on teachers and teaching
EditorsLawrence J. SAHA, A. Gary DWORKIN
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherSpringer Science+Business Media, LLC
Pages511-523
ISBN (Print)0387733167, 9780387733166, 0387733175, 9780387733173
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Reward
Employees
Autonomy
Assignment
Seniority
Guarantee
Participation
Reward system
Pay-for-performance
Factors

Citation

Wong, P. M. (2009). Teachers and promotion: Research evidence on the role of gender, career intentions, promotion criteria and teacher satisfaction. In L. J. Saha & A. G. Dworkin (Eds.), International handbook of research on teachers and teaching (pp. 511-523). New York: Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.