Stress and occupational well-being among Canadian faculty members: Moderating role of positive emotion regulation

Raheleh SALIMZADEH, Alenoush SAROYAN, Hui WANG, Nathan C. HALL

Research output: Contribution to conferencePapers

Abstract

Empirical evidence reveals that faculty report high levels of occupational stress, which in turn compromises their personal and occupational well-being. Despite the established impact of positive emotion regulation on well-being, this topic remains underexplored among faculty members. The present study examined the moderating role of adaptive and maladaptive positive emotion regulation strategies in the association between stress and four aspects of well-being: emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, quitting intentions, and physical health. Findings from 585 Canadian faculty members revealed that adaptive strategies did not significantly interact with stress in predicting well-being. Three interaction effects were found between stress and maladaptive strategies with regard to emotional exhaustion, quitting intentions, and physical well-being. Implications for professional development and intervention programs are discussed. Copyright © 2019 All Academic, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019

Citation

Salimzadeh, R., Saroyan, A., Wang, H., & Hall, N. C. (2019, April). Stress and occupational well-being among Canadian faculty members: Moderating role of positive emotion regulation. Paper presented at The American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting (AERA 2019): Paper session of Advancing faculty development: Self-efficacy, availability, and learning communities, Toronto, Canada.

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